The best of what to eat/shop/do in your city, delivered in a brown paper bag

Wake up to daily updates in your inbox

15.09.2014

It is perhaps more fitting in today’s dying DIY age to say “use your hands” rather than “use your head”.

Use your hands to make stuff, rake stuff, break stuff and put it back together. Use your hands to fold paper, to mould Plasticine. To feel cloth, to turn the pages of Grapes of Wrath, to make a painstakingly pretty origami moth.

If your hands have taken a dazzle to DIY already, go on over to Makers Asylum, a community space in Bandra that encourages the Maker movement.

Use your hands to make stuff, rake stuff, break stuff and put it back together. Use your hands to fold paper, to mould Plasticine. To feel cloth, to turn the pages of Grapes of Wrath, to make a painstakingly pretty origami moth.

Metal Asylum

Located in a garage tricked out with woodwork tools, DIY equipment and a 3D printer, Makers Asylum is the brainchild of Vaibhav Chhabra, a mechanical engineer who previously worked at EyeNetra, an MIT startup. Having pottered around in a huge maker space when he was at MIT, Vaibhav tells bpb that this exposed him to a group of people with similar interests but varied viewpoints, which encouraged his creative bent of mind. After returning to India, Vaibhav was keen to create a similar set up.

“What started as a hobby space in Bandra for people to come in and experiment every Sunday has now grown into a larger community that is pushing the do-it-yourself (DIY) culture in the city,” says Vaibhav. Launched with the help of partners Anool Mahidharia, Kirti Shetty and Samarth Shah, who have backgrounds in electronics, biomedical engineering and art respectively, Makers Asylum is open to anyone who is interested in learning.

How You Can Use Makers Asylum

Becoming a member (for Rs 1,500 a month) at Makers Asylum entitles you to access the space, use their tools, gets discounts on weekly training sessions and connects you to a larger network of interesting people.

You can even just sign up for a one-off session and learn to use equipment and work the 3D printer. Vaibhav tells bpb that the community has also taken up projects for other companies where they’ve redesigned 3D printers and helped build prototypes for a behavioural psychology consultancy. “So far, we’ve had architects make floor plans, people build machine parts, bobbleheads and even random toys through the 3D printer. It’s really up to you what you make,” says Vaibhav.

Bob(ble) the Builder?

Curious but not fully convinced? You can catch Vaibhav and friends at the Make Day event they are planning at Studio X on September 20th, where they will hold sessions on origami, 3D printing, pipe lamp building and a screening of Maker, a documentary about the Maker movement and DIY culture in the US.

Getting There: Makers Asylum, Rizvi Palace, Hill Road, Santosh Nagar, Bandra (W), call 7710991000, open noon to 9 pm daily. See their Facebook page and more details about the event here.

Wake up to daily updates on what to eat/shop/do in your city

Show me more
Intel